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Mid Wales Inland Towns & Villages

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The village of Devil's Bridge, which translated in Welsh is Pontarfynach, means 'The bridge on the Mynach' is internationally famous for its waterfalls, and the Rheidol narrow gauge Steam Railway.

Ceredigion, SY23 3JW

Walkers are Welcome Towns and Villages

 

Welshpool is a Mid Wales town which lies only 4 miles from the border with England. Its Welsh name 'Y Trallwng' means 'the marshy or sinking land' referring to the fact that the town is low-lying on the River Severn.

Powys, SY21 7DD

 

Tregaron nestles in the foothills of the Cambrian Mountains near the source of the river Teifi. In the 19th Century, it was a thriving market town and an important stop for drovers on their routes through Wales to English markets.

Walkers are Welcome Towns and Villages

 

A busy, historic market town, Rhayader is named after 'Rhayadr Gwy', a Welsh name for a local waterfall on the Wye. The town is situated in the very heart of Mid Wales in the beautiful Upper Wye Valley sheltered by the Cambrian Mountains.

Powys, LD6 5BU

 

A historic market town, Montgomery is just one mile from Offa's Dyke and the Welsh-Shropshire border. There is much to explore in the area including Montgomery Castle and the town's cobbled streets and Georgian and Victorian architecture.

Powys, SY15 6HN

Walkers are Welcome Towns and Villages

 

Llandrindod Wells, or 'Landod' as it is known to locals, is the administrative centre of Powys and one of its largest towns. As the name suggests, it owes its origins to the spring waters that were recognised to have healing properties.

Walkers are Welcome Towns and Villages

 

Newtown, known in Welsh as 'Y Drenewydd', is the largest town in Powys and is situated on the banks of the River Severn. Founded at the end of the 13th century, Newtown boasts a rich industrial heritage, surrounded by beautiful countryside.

Powys, SY16 2BB

 

Situated 2 miles north-west of Knighton, Knucklas (Cnwclas) is a small village just south of the border with England in the upper valley of the River Teme.

Powys, LD7 1PW

 

Llanfechain is a small village with a population of around 500 situated in the north of the county of Powys in Mid Wales, between Llanfyllin and Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain.

Llanfechain, Powys, SY22 6UQ

 

The village of Bucknell, with a population of 650, is just on the English side of the border with Wales and about 6 miles east of Knighton.

Shropshire, SY7 0AA

 

North-east of Machynlleth and south-east of Dolgellau, the village of Dinas Mawddwy is just to the side of the A470 at the junction with the mountain road to Lake Vyrnwy and Bala.

Gwynedd, LL49 9LP

 

Llanbrynmair is on the edge of the Cambrian Mountains and the Dyfi Biospere. The Glyndwr's Way National Trail passes through the village.

Powys, SY19 7AA

 

The small village of Llandinam is located on the River Severn on the A470 2.5 miles south of Caersws and 5 miles north-east of Llanidloes.

Powys, SY17 5BY

 

Llandysul is ideally situated for exploring the varied and beautiful counties of Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire and the Brecon Beacons and is almost equidistant from the larger towns of Cardigan, Carmarthen and Lampeter.

Ceredigion, SA44 4DN

Walkers are Welcome Towns and Villages

 

Hay-on-Wye - in Welsh 'Y Gelli Gandryll' or just 'Y Gelli' is well known as 'the town of books' and is home to the Hay Literature Festival.

Powys, HR3 5DG

Walkers are Welcome Towns and Villages

 

Oswestry is the third largest town in Shropshire with a population of 17,000; it is five miles from the border with Wales and has a mixed Welsh and English heritage.

Shropshire, SY11 2TE

 

Bow Street is a large village 4 miles north-east of Aberystwyth stretching out along the road to Machynlleth.

Ceredigion, SY20 8TG

 

Brecon is a town where you'll enjoy losing yourself...not only in the narrow streets and passageways lined with Georgian and Jacobean shopfronts, but in the sense of timelessness about the place.

Powys, LD3 7AD

 
 
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