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Image of a mpa of Powys. On this page there is information and things to do and towns and villages in Powys. find accommodation and special offers in and around powys and the Mid Wales Marches

Mid Wales Marches, Powys Towns| Walks | Accommodation | Events

The 'Ancient Kingdom of Powys' is the largest county in Wales extending from southern Snowdonia to the north, the Cambrian Mountains to the west, across to the Mid Wales Marches borderlands and the Brecon Beacons to the south. 

To the west of the county is Machynlleth the ancient capital of Wales in the heart of the Dyfi Valley. The River Severn winds it's way quietly from it's source in Pumlinon through the rural landscapes and market towns of Llanidloes, Newtown and Welshpool. 

Wales' boundary changes in 1974 merged the old counties of Montgomeryshire, Radnorshire and Brecknockshire and local museums tell the story of the area from Roman times through to the present day. 

'Must see' attractions and places to visit include Powis Castle and Gardens, Lake Vyrnwy and Elan Valley reservoirs, Glyndwr's Way and Offa's Dyke National Trails, and the scenic Cambrian Railway and Heart of Wales Railway. Relax and enjoy this beautiful area in the Heart of Wales. 

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Image of Saxon Map of Shropshire & The Marches, click the image to go to The MArches page to look for things to do and accommodation in and around Powys and the Marches

The Welsh Marches

The Welsh Marches denotes an imprecisely defined area along and around the border between England and Wales. The precise meaning of the term has varied at different periods. The English terms 'Welsh March' and 'The March of Wales', were originally used in the Middle Ages to denote a more precisely defined territory, the marches between England and the Principality of Wales, in which Marcher lords had specific rights, held to some extent independently of the King of England.

Picture of the Black Mountains

The Black Mountains

The Black Mountains are a group of hills spread across parts of Powys and Monmouthshire in southeast Wales, and extending across the national border into Herefordshire, England. They are the easternmost of the four ranges of hills that comprise the Brecon Beacons National Park.The Black Mountains may be roughly defined as those hills contained within a triangle defined by the towns of Abergavenny in the southeast, Hay-on-Wye in the north and the village of Llangors in the west. Another 'gateway' town to the Black Mountains is Talgarth.

Picture of the Brecon Beacons

The Brecon Beacons

The Brecon Beacons National Park contains some of the most spectacular and distinctive upland formations in southern Britain and covers an area of 520 square miles. Visitor centres at Libanus, Pen-y-Cae and Pontneddfechan. Stretching from Hay-on-Wye in the east to Llandeilo in the west and including four ranges of mountains; the Black Mountains, the Central Beacons, Fforest Fawr and the Black Mountain(Mynydd Du).

Lake Vyrnwy

Lake Vyrnwy

Lake Vyrnwy is set amidst the remote and beautiful Berwyn Mountains. With spectacular waterfalls, and unspoilt open countryside, a visit to Lake Vyrnwy is a wonderful day out for all the family. Lake Vyrnwy is such a beautiful location, the mountains embrace a lake containing some twelve billion gallons of water resulting in scenery reminiscent of the Alps. The lake which is 5 miles long and half a mile wide looks incredibly natural and you can hardly believe that it was created in the late 19th century by Liverpool Corporation, to provide a storage reservoir of safe water for the rapidly growing city of Liverpool.

Walking in Powys and Mid Wales Marches

Wye Valley Walk

Wye Valley Walk: The Wye Valley Walk is an easy grade continuous walking trail that follows the river valley from Chepstow to Rhayader, and continues to its source near Pumlumon in the hills above Aberystwyth. The 136 mile (218km) route criss-crosses the lower border between Wales and England through a wonderful variety of scenery.

Picture of a sign for Glyndwrs Way Walk, click the image for more information including nearby attractions and accommdodation to the Glyndwrs Way Walk

Glyndwr's Way: The 132 mile National Trail is set in the heart of Wales' breathtaking Cambrian Mountains countryside and is dedicated to the 15th Century Welsh warrior and self proclaimed 'Prince Owain Glyndwr'.

Picture of the Severn Way Walk in The Hafren Forest, Llanidloes, click the image to find more information about walks through the seveen way, also find nearby accommodation and attractions

Severn Way Walk: The Severn Way is the longest river walk in Britain, tracing the 210 miles of the River Severn. From its source at Plynlimon (Pumlumon) in the Cambrian Mountains to the sea at Bristol. This waymarked route passes through some beautiful countryside, lovely villages, castle towns and market centres including: Newtown, Llanidloes, Montgomery & Welshpool.

PIcture of the sign for the Offa's Dyke national Centre, click the image to find out more information including nearby accommodation and attractions to the offas dyke walk and centre

Offas's Dyke: One of the earliest of the National Trails, this long distance footpath must rate as the best walk in Britain. The 177 mile (285km) route extends from North Wales to Chepstow in South Wales following an 8th Century earthwork built by King Offa sometime between 756 and 796

Powys Lakes, Waterfalls & Reservoirs

Picture of The Elan Valley Reservoir, click the image to go through to more information, here you will find moer information including nearby accommodation and attractions to the elan valley reservoir

Elan Valley Reservoir: The 70 square mile Elan Valley Estate has five reservoirs and is popular with people who come to see the spectacular scenery, which is ideal for walkers, cyclists and bird watchers. A series of dams were constructed at the end of the 19th century to provide water to Birmingham and many parts of mid and south Wales. There is a large Visitor Centre which is a good starting point for your visit.

Picture of Lake Vyrnwy, click the image to find more information including accommdoation around lake vrynwy

Lake Vynwy: Lake Vyrnwy is a beautiful location, where the mountains embrace a lake containing some twelve billion gallons of water resulting in scenery reminiscent of the Alps. The lake which is 5 miles long and half a mile wide looks incredibly natural and you can hardly believe that it was created in the late 19th century by Liverpool Corporation.

Picture Llyn Clywedog in Llanidloes, click the image for more information including nearby accommodation places to stay in llanidloes and other attractions and activites

Llyn Clywedog: Clywedog is a man made lake where there are a number of walks including the Clywedog Gorge Trail around the Bryn Tail Mine workings and the Llyn Clywedog Scenic Trail.The National Trail of Glyndwr's Way also passes beneath the dam before pursuing a course along the southern shore of the lake.

PIcture of the Pistyll Rhaeadr Waterfall, click the image to find mroe information including nearby attractions and accommodation providers

Pistyll Rhaeadr: Pistyll Rhaeadr is an enchanting waterfall in the Berwyn Mountains, just inside Wales, west of Oswestry and Shrewsbury. At 240ft (80m) high it is the UK tallest single drop waterfall.

Picture of Llyn Brianne

Llyn Brianne- Llyn Brianne is a spectacular reservoir at almost 300m (990ft) above sea level. It holds over 64 million cubic metres of water contained by a 91m (300ft) stone-built dam and is the largest of its kind in Europe.

Castles in Powys

Picture of Powis Castle, click the image to find more information including events and accommodation around Powis Castle and Welshpool

Powis Castle: The world-famous Powis Castle & Gardens are overhung with clipped yews sheltering rare and tender plants. Laid out under the influence of Italian and French styles, it retains its original lead statues and an orangery on the terraces. High on a rock above the terraces, the castle, originally built in around 1200, began life as a medieval fortress.

Picture of Montgomery Castle, click the link to find out more about the castle, including accommodation and other places to visit around Montgomery and newtown powys

Montgomery Castle: Montgomery Castle is a stone masonry castle looking over the town of Montgomery in Powys, Mid Wales. It is one of many Norman castles on the border between Wales and England.

Picture of Dolforwyn Castle, click the link to find out more about the castle on the other page you'll also find information about nearby accommodation and other attractions

Dolforwyn Castle: Dolforwyn Castle was built between 1273-77 by Llywelyn ap Gruffudd (Llywelyn the Last) as a forward position in his territory, and overlooking the English lordship of Montgomery.

Picture of Tretower Castle, click the link to find out more about this historic castle. On the link you'll also find nearby attractions and accommodation

Tretower Castle: Set against the beautiful background of the Brecon Beacons, a visit to Tretower Court and Castle is a unique journey through history that dates back to Norman times.

 
 

Picture of Powis Castle, click the link to go to interactive maps showing what else there is to do in Powys including events, attractions and activities
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